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ANSHAREE YORKSHIRE TERRIERS

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THE YORKSHIRE TERRIER
GENERAL APEARANCE
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CHOOSING A PUPPY
TEMPERAMENT TRAINING & HEALTH
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TEMPERAMENT TRAINING & HEALTH

Temparament
 
The Yorkie is without doubt one of the most appealing of all Toy breeds. It is charming and intelligent, and despite its size, is full of courage, loyalty and affection. Although this breed is small, the Yorkie still retains the true Terrier temperament. Yorkies are small enough to carry and are ideal for anyone with a small home or apartment. The Yorkie is happy to go on quite long walks, but is equally happy to run around a small garden or home, providing it has enough toys and distractions to occupy its lively mind. These are little dogs who think they are much bigger. They will defend their territory decisively. They have an acute sense of hearing and will alert their owners to the slightest sign of intruders. They can be very noisy, so consideration must be given to neighbours when considering this breed as a pet.

Training

 

Yorkies are generally easy to house train. For their own safety it is better to crate train them and to leave them in a crate when they are left alone, e.g. during the night or if their owners are out of the home. Always leave them some toys and fresh water, and be sure they have a cosy bed inside the crate. Remember that as they do enjoy human company they will not appreciate being left alone for long periods.

Obedience training is highly recommended for Yorkies. Although few Yorkies compete in obedience in the UK today, a little dog called "Shandy" did compete successfully, and was placed in the highly acclaimed obedience championships at Cruft's in 1973. All breeds can and do benefit nevertheless from basic obedience training.

 

Health & Longevity

 

Yorkies are generally hardy and healthy and long-lived. Like many Toy breeds however, there is some incidence of hereditary/congenital disease in the form of patella luxation, open fontanellas, Perthe's disease and a smaller incidence of elongated soft palate and a tendency to collapsed trachea. *   However, conscientious breeders only breed from sound, selected stock, and do their best to eliminate these defects. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that one buy only from a reputable breeder, and never purchase a puppy from a pet shop or 'puppy farm'. Wherever possible one should see the puppy in the home where it was bred, and view its parents, or at least its mother. A reputable breeder will offer constant support and assistance throughout the dog's life. To purchase a puppy from an unreliable source may invite future heartbreak (and huge vet's bills).

* NB: The BVA/KC who conduct health screening schemes for inherited are now advising that Yorkies should undergo eye tests for PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) and late onset HC (Hereditary Cataract) . These conditions are under investigation in the UK for this breed. In the USA, many breeders already have their breeding stock tested for PRA.


Training your Yorkie

Yorkies are generally easy to house train. For their own safety it is better to crate train them and to leave them in a crate when they are left alone, e.g. during the night or if their owners are out of the home. Always leave them some toys and fresh water, and be sure they have a cosy bed inside the crate. Remember that as they do enjoy human company they will not appreciate being left alone for long periods, but if you have to then leave on the radio or tv. Obedience training is highly recommended for Yorkies. Although few Yorkies compete in obedience in the UK today, a little dog called "Shandy" did compete successfully, and was placed in the highly acclaimed obedience championships at Cruft's in 1973. All breeds can and do benefit nevertheless from basic obedience training.


Health & Longevity

Yorkies are generally hardy and healthy and long-lived. Like many Toy breeds however, there is some incidence of hereditary/congenital disease in the form of patella luxation, open fontanellas, Perthe's disease and a smaller incidence of elongated soft palate and a tendency to collapsed trachea. * However, conscientious breeders only breed from sound, selected stock, and do their best to eliminate these defects. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that one buy only from a reputable breeder, and never purchase a puppy from a pet shop or 'puppy mill'. Wherever possible one should see the puppy in the home where it was bred, and view its parents, or at least its mother. A reputable breeder will offer constant support and assistance throughout the dog's life. To purchase a puppy from an unreliable source may invite future heartbreak (and huge vet's bills). * NB: The BVA/KC who conduct health screening schemes for inherited are now advising that Yorkies should undergo eye tests for PRA and late onset HC. These conditions are under investigation in the UK for this breed. In the USA, many breeders already have their breeding stock tested for PRA.