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ANSHAREE YORKSHIRE TERRIERS

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CHOOSING A PUPPY

Yorkies as pets

 

Yorkies will live happily with cats and other dogs if brought up with them, but being terriers, they are also very possessive of their owners, so care should be taken when introducing this breed to a new animal household member. If they do fight, they can fight to the death. As with all small dogs, great care should be taken when allowing small children to handle them, as they are prone to jump from any height, and of course, being small, are more susceptible to accidents around the home, by way of careless human feet and the opening and closing of doors. They do however love to play with sensible children. Their favourite sleeping place is their owner's lap.


Choosing your Puppy

What colour will my dog be?

All Yorkshire Terriers are born with smooth coats and are black with small tan points. It is only with maturity that the beautiful long, dark steel blue and shaded tan coat develops. This feature can vary in age depending on the individual, but when buying a puppy you can expect it to still be black on its body, and for its head markings to still be very "sooty" looking. In puppyhood this is not a fault. Some Yorkies do stay black, whilst others become very light and silver. Although these are considered faults for showing, it is impossible to determine in a young puppy what colour it will become as a young adult. In any case, the colour will not of course, affect the dog's quality as a companion.

Do Yorkies come in Miniature and Standard varieties?

Many beginning Yorkie fanciers believe that there are two types of Yorkie, Miniature and Standard--this is not so. However, many pet Yorkies are somewhat larger than the show Yorkies; again this does not affect their suitability as pets or make them any less desirable as companions.

How soon can a puppy be sold to a new home?

If a Yorkie is wanted only as a pet, a reputable breeder may be prepared to let a puppy go to a new home between 8-10 weeks of age (although 12 weeks is more desirable). A pet quality Yorkie will be far cheaper than a show quality specimen (which most breeders will not sell until much older). It is quite impossible to have any indication of show quality in this breed until the dog is at least 6 months of age.

What Sex is best as a pet?

This is a matter of personal preference. Most breeders believe both dogs and bitches are equally loving, loyal and intelligent, and make good companions. A bitch may come into season from 6 months onwards, when extra care must be taken to prevent unwanted matings. Pet Yorkies are better neutered. This will prevent unwanted puppies and the possibility of disease in later life. Many breeders may not wish to issue registration papers for pet puppies, or may only do so on proof of neutering.

What should I feed my Yorkie?

When collecting your puppy be sure to get a diet sheet from the breeder and try to stick to its recommendations, especially in the first few weeks. The breeder should also provide you with documentation of worming preparations given, any vaccinations the puppy may have had, and a pedigree form.

How should I keep my Yorkie confined when travelling? 

ALWAYS make sure that your dog is safe and secure when travelling in a vehicle. The best way to do this is to train it to travel in a special travelling box or crate (such as a Vari-Kennel). Should you need to brake suddenly, your little dog will then be less likely to be thrown forward and injured. Keeping your dog in a crate while travelling will also prevent it from distracting the driver and causing an accident.

One further word of warning, In some countries it is common to own a swimming pool. If you do, please ensure that your Yorkie cannot jump or fall into the pool in your absence. I have had reports from the USA of Yorkie's getting into pools and then being unable to get out again, with drastic consequences as the poor little dog becomes exhausted and drowns. If you do have a pool, please ensure that it is fenced off or covered when not in use.

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